Granada, Spain – travel tips and more!


Alhambra in Granada, SpainTwo months of Spain, with stories, travel tips, historical tidbits and more continues with Granada!

Granada is a must see! I went to Granada one summer for three days. You can take the train but I took a flight from Madrid to Granada, a little over an hour flight time. My advice is to stay within the old city since there is a lot to see and everything can then be reached by walking.

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Of course the main site to see is The Alhambra. You need a full day to see the entire complex of the Alhambra. I bought tickets on-line before my trip so I was able to by pass long lines and enter right away, see travel tips below for more info on how to do this.

I am an avid walker so the steep climb up to The Alhambra did not faze me, but there is a bus that takes visitors up the hill as well. The walk up to the Alhambra does allow you to see the lay of the land, appreciate the location, and to see a few details like fountains and old gate entrances to the Alhambra along the way. It is also the way the palace was approached before modern conveniences so you really get the full impact of what it was like to slowly reach the palace.

The Alhambra was built in the 14th century for the Muslim Emirs and the court of the Nasrid dynasty. After 1492 portions of the buildings were used by Christian rulers and in 1572, Charles V built the Palace of Charles V. The combination of the Islamic and 16th century architecture as well as the gardens and fountains makes this a unique location and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The Palace of Charles V is the section I came upon first. The building façade has an Italian feel. The most interesting feature of the Palace is a circular patio in the center of the building.

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From the Palace I explored portions of the gardens which then lead to Nazrid Palaces. The rooms in this section are probably the most recognized of the Alhambra. Each room is stunning and contains so many details, carvings, tiles, and intricate patterns. The Court of the Myrtles has a large reflecting pool, the source of many photographs, but don’t forget to notice the architectural details as well. (As a side note, if you are a cat lover you will notice cats all over the city of Granada and in the Alhambra. While in the Court of the Myrtles I saw a tabby kitten getting attention from another cat-lover-tourist who slid a set of keys along the stone floor and which the kitten chased).

There is also the Court of the Lions which is an impressive space with more intricate details and the Fountain of the Lions in the center of the courtyard. There are numerous theories as to the symbolism, means, and importance of the fountain. As an aside: while originally planned as a complex of six palaces, the Alhambra did become a palatine city with an irrigation system that is still functioning!

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From this area I followed hallways into other room and courtyards. Eventually I made my way back into the gardens where there is a large pool and a portico. If you go to the garden’s edge you will find the path that leads to the Palacio de Generalife.

The Palacio de Generalife, or the Generalife, was a summer palace for the Nasrid Emirs Kings built in the 14th century. The palace is rather large with gardens, patios, and fountains. The Court of the Water Channel is so picturesque and you get great view of the Alhambra and the city from this point as well. The Generalife is a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well.

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Aside from the Alhambra there is also the old town of Granada. The old section of Granada is rather large and there are many streets and plazas to see. The Granada Cathedral is interesting because the interior is completely white and very cavernous. The Cathedral took over 180 years to build! The Royal Chapel of Granada is a mausoleum that houses Queen Isabella I and King Ferdinand II and other Catholic Monarchs. And there are many smaller churches to see as well.

I suggest visiting the Archaeological Museum of Granada which is housed in a 16th century palace. The admission fee is less then two Euros and worth a visit!

Also if you venture up the hills across from the Alhambra you will find more churches and monasteries with charming courtyards. You will also see remains of the old city wall and walk through a maze of cobble stoned stairs and streets lined with white houses. I recommend finding a spot in this area at sunset to get a panoramic view of the Alhambra.

And lastly you can venture over to Sacromonte, a neighborhood further up in the hills with houses built into the hillside. The area is known for being a center of flamenco dancing and songs. There is little museum with cave-like houses you can enter.

So overall there is a lot to see in Granada! Hopefully this blog gave you some helpful information and pointers on what to see!

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Travel Tips:
1 – Get to Granada with EasyJet! Fast, cheap, and easy flights!

2 – Buy tickets on-line for the Alhambra before you get there, that way you avoid the long lines and you are guaranteed entry since they can sell out! Click here for the link to the official Alhambra on-line ticket website.

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For more information and helpful website about Granada:

1 – About Granada click here for a useful tourism site.

2 – For more about the Alhambra click here.

3 – For a useful map of the Alhambra that will help you get your bearings and see how large a complex it is, click here.

4 – To read more about the Court of the Lions click here.

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themonicastoreblog

I love to travel and I love taking pictures.

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